A light of hope for seabirds

albatross.jpg(Francisco González Táboas & Leo Tamini; 21 march 2017)

A new light of hope opened last week for large seabirds when Argentina established the use of measures to prevent its death in fisheries.

The days are not easy in the South Atlantic. Life is hard on the ship. The bad weather, the waves of several meters of height and the constant movement make the tasks of the sailors more difficult. The days, weeks and months away from the families accumulate and make the mainland a very coveted good. However, most of these men – and women – on board love the sea. They love their fish, which give them work and livelihood to live. And they love birds too. The immense and impressive albatrosses and petrels are, along with dolphins and whales, faithful companions of the days on the high seas.

And there are a few times when they have to kill or sacrifice some of these birds, which are caught in the dragging cables of the nets. In fact they are many. It is estimated that every year between 9,000 and 18,000 black-browed albatrosses Thalassarche melanophrys die on only thirty Argentine freezer vessels fishing for hake.

With the help of the Albatross Task Force Argentina of Aves Argentinas (BirdLife in the country), boat workers have learned to recognize and identify each species: the black-browed mollymawk Thalassarche melanophris, the Daption capense petrel, the Southern giant petrel Macronectes giganteus, the white capped albatross Thalassarche cauta, the Southern royal albatros of the south Diomedea epomophora and, of course, the king of the seas, the wandering albatross Diomedea exulans, among others, are part of the varied avifauna of those icy Seas.

Each death of one of them hurts. However they have also learned that things can be done to prevent these birds from dying while fishing.…..

Read more in spanish

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