Tag Archives: rare

Researchers in Cambodia find nest of rare riverine bird

(Physorg 20 July 2017)

Wildlife researchers in Cambodia have found a breeding location for the masked finfoot, one of the world’s most endangered birds, raising hopes of its continuing survival.

The New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society said Thursday its scientists, along with conservationists from Cambodia’s Environment Ministry and residents along the Memay river in the Kulen Promtep Wildlife Sanctuary, discovered the only confirmed breeding location in Cambodia for the very rare species.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature has placed the bird on its red list of globally endangered species because its worldwide population of less than 1,000 is declining at an alarming rate. It is found only in Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam.

Poaching and cutting down the trees where the bird lives are causing the population decline, said Eng Mengey, a communications officer at the Wildlife Conservation Society.

The Kulen Promtep Wildlife Sanctuary is one of several in Cambodia’s Preah Vihear province that are home to many endangered bird species, including the critically endangered giant ibis and white-shouldered ibis, the Wildlife Conservation Society said.

“This finding provides further evidence that the Northern Plains of Cambodia is an important biodiversity hotspot and critical area for conserving breeding habitat for globally threatened water birds,” Alistair Mould, a technical adviser for the society, said in a statement.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-07-cambodia-rare-riverine-bird.html#jCp

Are Australia’s native pigeons sitting ducks?

(Andrew Peters, Charles Sturt University 13 July 2017)

The word “pigeon” evokes thoughts of gentle cooing, fluttering in rafters, and poo-encrusted statues. The species responsible for the encrustation is deeply familiar to us, having ridden waves of European expansionism to inhabit every continent, including Australia. First domesticated thousands of years ago, urban pigeons have turned feral again.

Less familiar are the native species that are not your stereotypical pigeons: a posse of pointy-headed crested pigeons in a suburban park, or a flock of topknot pigeons feeding in a camphor laurel.

Australia and its neighbouring islands are the global epicentre of pigeon and dove (or “columbid”) diversity with the highest density of different columbids – an impressive 134 species – found in the region. Twenty-two of these native species are found in Australia alone, in just about every habitat.

These native species play an important role in ecosystem functioning: they forage for and disperse seeds, concentrate nutrients in the environment, and are a source of food for predators. Fruit doves for example, are zealous fruitarians, and the region’s tropical rainforests depend on them for tree diversity. Where fruit-doves have disappeared in the South Pacific, numerous plant species have lost an effective dispersal mechanism.

The future of Australia’s native pigeons however, may depend on our domestic pigeons. Australia’s domestic pigeon population—both feral and captive – is large and interconnected by frequent local and interstate movements. Pigeon racing, for example, involves releasing captive birds hundreds of kilometres from their homes only so they may find their way back. While most birds do navigate home, up to 20% will not return, of which some will join feral pigeon populations. Birds are also traded across the country and illegally from overseas. These movements, together with poor biosecurity practices, mean that captive pigeons can and do mingle with feral domestic pigeons.

Read more

Little Blue neighbours

little-penguin.jpg(Shaun Hurrell, 6 July 2017; Photo Richard Robinson)

They can be found nesting on people’s doorsteps, or quite literally underneath them. Meet the world’s smallest penguins, unwillingly urban birds who are being given new homes by local volunteers

Wellington city, a few metres from the water. On the edge of a hot, flat tarmac car park, Kimberley Collins is removing stones from the top of a wooden box, tucked away under a bush. Hinging back the lid, inside is a slate-blue backed penguin about 35 cm long, lying on its belly looking up at her with endearing eyes and a sleek white chin.

The Little Penguin Eudyptula minor, known as kororā in Maori, is the world’s smallest penguin, and when they are not crossing dangerous roads, these unwillingly urban birds are struggling to find shady crevices to nest. Kimberley is a local volunteer who is checking the box, installed by Forest & Bird, whose head office is in the nearby city. Their “Places for Penguins” project, which started in 2007, has so far installed hundreds of nest boxes around Wellington, its harbour, nearby bays and islands, as well as producing signage, awareness work, planting thousands of native plants, and invasive predator control. Wellington’s Mayor has even lent her hand with penguin monitoring.

“Little blues”, although declining in numbers, are a Least Concern species globally (however recent evidence suggests that Australia’s could be a separate species, in which case the threat category could increase). They can often be found nesting all over New Zealand’s coastlines, on people’s doorsteps… or quite literally directly underneath them. This close relationship with humans was not always welcomed, but now most embrace their flippered neighbours – including people like Fraser Ross, who is a long time Forest & Bird member and part of local group Timaru Penguins, on the east coast of South Island. One of many volunteers, he can often be found counting nests or in friendly, explanatory conversation with scores of tourists that line the rocks as penguins arrive at dusk, preventing flash photography, and, when the need arises, checking under cars before people drive away.

Read more

 

Penguins of the remote rainforest

tawaki.jpg

(Shaun Hurrell 4 July 2017; Photo Richard Robinson)

Grab a kayak, hiking boots and become an expert at crawling through rocks if you want to discover New Zealand’s hidden Fiordland Penguins, or “tawaki”. But why are they going hungry?

There’s a saying that says biting insects exist to protect beautiful places from humans. In Fiordland, which forms the remote and rugged southwest of the South Island, this almost rings true, wherein hides mainland New Zealand’s hidden rainforest penguins. “Most New Zealanders wouldn’t recognise a tawaki as a native species”, says Thomas Mattern, researcher at Otago University, and penguin specialist part of The Tawaki Project.

Despite striking yellow feathers above their eyes, Fiordland Penguins Eudyptes pachyrhynchus are hard to see. Named after a Maori god that walked the earth, Tawaki, they are actually quite a timid species and live in small scattered colonies in the steep and water-weathered forests of New Zealand’s fiords, a place only accessible by water or multi-day treks through clouds of irritating biting sandflies. Whilst thousands of tourists brave bad weather for boat trips into these stunning landscapes, the plight of the tawaki is not well known. On Stewart Island too, they do not want to be found, shrouding themselves in very dense vegetation, rock crevices and even sea caves only accessible underwater. With a range that has retreated since the arrival of humans, you can see why they might be so timid.

“We are only beginning to understand the threats tawaki face”

“To date, little is known about their ecology”, says Thomas. He, together with Robin Long – who works as a ranger for the West Coast Penguin Trust and grew up in this remote environment – are now experts at crawling between jagged rocks and kayaking through rain-splattered fiords to find these 55 cm tall penguins, as part of the Tawaki Project, to learn more of their breeding and foraging success by using camera traps on nests and fitting waterproof GPS tags. Last summer, El Niño hit the penguins hard: data loggers revealed some tawaki heading 100 km out to sea to search for food. “A lot of chicks died of starvation”, says Thomas. “We found some with just sticks and mud in their stomachs.”

Read more

Bonapartemåger på Island Bonapartemåger på Island

(Henrik Haaning Nielsen 25 juni 2017; Photo Jens Frimer Andersen)

 

Danske kunstnere for Natur og Miljø besøgte i år Island. De stod for intet mindre end en ornitologisk sensation, da de opdagede et ynglepar af bonapartemåge! Der er tale om det første ynglefund i Vestpalearktis!

Vi er en gruppe danske naturkunstnere på tegne/fugle tur til Vestfjord-landet. På en tur den 9. juni bliver jeg ved et strandkær, i en mindre hættemågekoloni, opmærksom på hovedet af en mindre måge  som har et tydeligt  sortgråt hoved og sort spinkelt næb, tydeligt afvigende fra de hættemåger med brune hoveder som den står iblandt.

Danske kunstnere for Natur og Miljø besøgte i år Island. De stod for intet mindre end en ornitologisk sensation, da de opdagede et ynglepar af bonapartemåge! Der er tale om det første ynglefund i Vestpalearktis! Jens Frimer Andersen har været så venlig at sende beskrivelsen af hændelsesforløbet da han opdagede bonapartemågerne: Vi er en gruppe danske naturkunstnere på tegne/fugle tur til Vestfjord-landet. På en tur den 9. juni bliver jeg ved et strandkær, i en mindre hættemågekoloni, opmærksom på hovedet af en mindre måge som har et tydeligt sortgråt hoved og sort spinkelt næb, tydeligt afvigende fra de hættemåger med brune hoveder som den står iblandt.

Det er solskin og godt medlys. Afstanden er ca 80-100 meter. Tænker først dværgmåge adult, men da fuglen efter få sekunder letter viser den overvinge som Hættemåge. Det må være en af amerikanerne med mørk hætte – Præriemåge eller Bonapartemåge??? Nu let panisk får jeg gjort de andre, Westy Ebbesen og Dorthe Kudsk, opmærksom på fuglen, mens jeg konsulterer “Fugle i felten”. Sagen er klar: Bonapartemåge adult. Fuglen forsvinder let blandt de flyvende Hættemåger, men efter et stykke tid bliver jeg opmærksom på terneagtige skrig over vores hoveder, og ser, at det er bonapatemågen som meget heftigt og vedholdende skrigende mobber os med 5-6 dyk, ned til 2 meter fra os, for så at trække ind i kolonien igen. Optrinnet gentager sig 5-6 gange med en serie af dybe dyk,skrigende, for så at trække sig tilbage til kolonien. På intet tidspunkt reagerede Hættemågerne på vores tilstædeværelse. Vi opholdt os hele tiden på grusvejen for at undgå forstyrrelse. Ved 3 lejligheder så vi fuglen/fuglene flyve i display med dybe dyk med stejle vendinger på toppen, hvor der  drejes i luften, så fuglen næsten flyver på ryggen et kort øjeblik. Ved et tilfælde sås 2 fugle samtidig. Det er solskin og godt medlys. Afstanden er ca 80-100 meter. Tænker først dværgmåge adult, men da fuglen efter få sekunder letter viser den overvinge som Hættemåge. Det må være en af amerikanerne med mørk hætte – Præriemåge eller Bonapartemåge??? Nu let panisk får jeg gjort de andre, Westy Ebbesen og Dorthe Kudsk, opmærksom på fuglen, mens jeg konsulterer “Fugle i felten”. Sagen er klar: Bonapartemåge adult. Fuglen forsvinder let blandt de flyvende Hættemåger, men efter et stykke tid bliver jeg opmærksom på terneagtige skrig over vores hoveder, og ser, at det er bonapatemågen som meget heftigt og vedholdende skrigende mobber os med 5-6 dyk, ned til 2 meter fra os, for så at trække ind i kolonien igen. Optrinnet gentager sig 5-6 gange med en serie af dybe dyk,skrigende, for så at trække sig tilbage til kolonien. På intet tidspunkt reagerede Hættemågerne på vores tilstædeværelse. Vi opholdt os hele tiden på grusvejen for at undgå forstyrrelse. Ved 3 lejligheder så vi fuglen/fuglene flyve i display med dybe dyk med stejle vendinger på toppen, hvor der drejes i luften, så fuglen næsten flyver på ryggen et kort øjeblik. Ved et tilfælde sås 2 fugle samtidig.
De flyvende fugle er lidt mindre og mere elegante terne/dværgmåge-agtige end hættemågerne. Hætten er tydeligt gråsort i godt lys, med hvide halve øjenringe. Overvingen meget lig Hættemåge, med grå tone og hvid kile på håndens forkant, afgrænset af en smal sort bagkant på hånden. Undervingen er helt lys med gennemskinnelig hånd og sort havterneagtig bagkant. Hætten er mere lige afsat/afskåret ind Hættemåge. De næste efterfølgende dage, både D.10 og 11/6 besøger andre erfarne ornitologer fra vores gruppe bl.a. Niels Peter Andreasen, Marco Brodde, Niels Knudsen, Ole Runge og Lise Phlug, stedet og begge dage ser de positivt 2 fugle og oplever gentagende gange den hefDe flyvende fugle er lidt mindre og mere elegante terne/dværgmåge-agtige end hættemågerne. Hætten er tydeligt gråsort i godt lys, med hvide halve øjenringe. Overvingen meget lig Hættemåge, med grå tone og hvid kile på håndens forkant, afgrænset af en smal sort bagkant på hånden. Undervingen er helt lys med gennemskinnelig hånd og sort havterneagtig bagkant. Hætten er mere lige afsat/afskåret ind Hættemåge. De næste efterfølgende dage, både D.10 og 11/6 besøger andre erfarne ornitologer fra vores gruppe bl.a. Niels Peter Andreasen, Marco Brodde, Niels Knudsen, Ole Runge og Lise Phlug, stedet og begge dage ser de positivt 2 fugle og oplever gentagende gange den heftige mobbeadfærd fra bonapartemågerne når de står på grusvejen nær kolonien.tige mobbeadfærd fra bonapartemågerne når de står på grusvejen nær kolonien.

 

Bonapartemåge er udbredt primært i Canada og Alaska i taigazonen, hvor de primært yngler i gran- og lærketræer og kun undtagelsesvist på jorden, som det er sket i år i Island.

Lokale Yann Kolbeinsson er kontaktet og han vil besøge lokaliteten i den kommende uge.

Hold øje med nyt på Facebooksiden Birding Iceland.

Bonapartemåge er udbredt primært i Canada og Alaska i taigazonen, hvor de primært yngler i gran- og lærketræer og kun undtagelsesvist på jorden, som det er sket i år i Island. Lokale Yann Kolbeinsson er kontaktet og han vil besøge lokaliteten i den kommende uge. Hold øje med nyt på Facebooksiden Birding Iceland.

Storkesæsonen fusede ud i regn, rusk og kulde

(Jan Skriver 6 juli 2017)

Forårets spirende optimisme på storkefronten er afløst af kolde kendsgerninger. Danmark huser i år kun to par hvide storke, der trods en lovende start blot har udsigt til tre flyvefærdige unger

af

Ynglesæsonen 2017 for den hvide stork i Nordvesteuropa tegnede i det tidlige forår lovende med storkevenligt trækvejr i landene mod sydøst.

Men den vægelsindede april tippede meteorologisk set til den forkerte side set fra en trækkende storks synsvinkel, og maj blev hverken mild eller sød for de storke, der nåede frem.

Så nu kan en skuffende sæson for den hvide stork i Danmark gøres op.

”Facit bliver 2 ynglepar og 2 enlige fugle. De to storkepar vil tilsammen højst få tre unger på vingerne, selv om der har været masser af æg i rederne hos begge par. Desværre blev det kun til enlige storke i Nørreådalen ved Viborg og ligesådan i Bolderslev i Sønderjylland”, siger Hans Skov, der er Dansk Ornitologisk Forenings (DOF) førende ekspert i storke.

”April blev ganske enkelt en træls måned for trækkende storke på vej mod Nordeuropa. Efter en lovende begyndelse kom kulden med nordenvinden, og den holdt storketrækket tilbage, så vi ikke fik et rykind af mulige ynglefugle på de lokaliteter, hvor der var forventninger om ynglepar”, siger Hans Skov.

Massedød i nordtyske reder

Også maj blev præget af regn, rusk og kulde, hvilket resulterede i, at de etablerede storkepar mistede unger. I Gundsølille ved Roskilde har 7 æg resulteret i 2 unger, som ser ud til at klare sig. Og i Smedager i Sønderjylland endte 5 æg med at blive til kun en unge, som i skrivende stund er cirka tre uger gammel og i dunet dragt. Den skal helst have tørt og gerne lunt vejr de næste uger, hvis den skal blive flyvefærdig.

”Når storkeunger bliver så store, at forældrene ikke længere kan ligge og varme dem i reden, opstår en kritisk periode. Hvis der kommer store mængder af regn, mens det blæser kraftigt, bliver de dunede unger så nedkølede, at de dør af kulde. Det er sket i år i stor stil lige syd for den dansk-tyske grænse i det ellers storkevenlige og føderige Sydslesvig. Her er cirka 40 procent af alle storkeunger døde, fordi vejret har været imod ynglefuglene”, fortæller Hans Skov.

Udsigt til gode år i Nørreådalen

DOF’s storkeekspert, der i fire årtier nøje har fulgt udviklingen i den danske storkebestand, var i april optimistisk på vegne af Nørreådalen ved Viborg, hvor der i 2016 etablerede sig et storkepar, som dog kom for sent i gang til at yngle med succes. Parret etablerede sig sidste år først mod slutningen af juni.

Läs mer

New parrot species discovered in Mexico

Blue-winged Amazon(Matt Mendenhall 27 June 2017; Photo Tony Silva)

Ornithologists have announced the discovery of an apparent new species of parrot in a remote part of Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula. They’re calling it the Blue-winged Amazon because the tips of its wing feathers are bluish green. (Its Spanish name is Loro de alas azules.)

It will be up to the American Ornithological Society’s North and Middle American Classification Committee to decide whether to accept the parrot as a new species.

The authors of a paper describing the species propose that its scientific name be Amazona gomezgarzai. The Amazona genus includes about 30 other species native to the Americas, and the specific name, gomezgarzai, honors Miguel A. Gómez Garza, the man who first came across the birds and recognized that their colors differed from other known species. Gómez Garza is a wildlife veterinarian and the author of Loros de Mexico, a 2014 book about the parrots of Mexico.

He spotted the birds in early 2014 south of the town of Becanchén, which is about in the middle of the peninsula. The new parrot occupies a similar area in the Yucatán as the Yucatán Amazon (A. xantholora) and the White-fronted Amazon (A. albifrons), but it does not hybridize with them.

A distinctive feature of the new taxon is its call, which is loud, sharp, short, repetitive, and monotonous; one particular vocalization is more reminiscent of an accipiter than of any known parrot. The duration of syllables is much longer than in other Amazon parrot species. In flight, the call is a loud, short, sharp, and repetitive yak-yak-yak. While perched, the call is mellow and prolonged.

This species lives in small flocks of less than 12 individuals. Pairs and their offspring have a tendency to remain together and are discernible in groups. Like all members of the genus Amazona, this parrot is an herbivore. Its diet consists of seeds, fruits, flowers, and leaves obtained in the tree canopy.

An analysis of mitochondrial DNA genes indicates that the Blue-winged Amazon has evolved only recently, about 120,000 years ago, from the White-fronted Amazon.

The paper describing the species says it occurs in an area of roughly 100 square kilometers (39 square miles) centered south of Becanchén. “No part of the range is presently protected in any form,” the authors write. “Very little is known about this parrot’s biology. There is no conservation program currently in effect to preserve this parrot, but its long-term existence impinges on the local communities and making them aware of this parrot’s value as a result of its uniqueness, its potential as a bird watching attraction, and the fact that it is present only locally. Its small range and rarity should make its conservation a priority.”